Running User Commands in MO71

MO71 User Commands

The User Commands menu on a queue manager in MO71

Do you have a number of commands, or scripts, or batch jobs that you regularly use against your queue managers? How would like to be able to invoke them from the queue manager menu in MO71? In the latest version of MO71 just released, you can do just that. This might be useful when setting up MO71 for your operations team to use (see Delivering an MO71 Bundle to your MQ team) to pre-configure MO71 with the various scripts they should be using for tasks outside MO71.

MO71 User Command strmqm

A User Command that will invoke strmqm for the queue manager

Of course, not all user commands you might want to run would apply to all queue managers in your MO71 configuration, so when setting up User Commands in MO71 you can say which queue managers they apply to. For example, if your queue manager is local to MO71 you can use commands such as strmqm, but for remote queue manager’s you’ll need some sort of remote script to achieve the same. The easiest way to categorize your queue managers is to put them into various “networks” (MO71’s way of categorizing them – see Can you see your QMgr for the trees?). You could imagine a network called “Local” and another called “Remote” which you can then use to determine whether the User Command that runs strmqm can be used. You can make one User command definition which applies to all queue managers in the “Local” network and use the %q substitution character to pass the queue manager name through to the command.

Here you’ve seen an example of a substitution character allowing you to pull information from the location to build up the command. Other substitutions that pull information from the location details are as follows. If there are other things that might be useful to use from the location details as substitutions in User Commands, let us know.

Insert Meaning
%c Location CLNTCONN connection name
%g Location Group Name
%l Location Name
%q Queue Manager Name

If you need to use any environment variables, for example MQ_DATA_PATH or MQ_INSTALLATION_PATH, these can also be used in substitutions in your User Commands with the following syntax:-

%[MQ_DATA_PATH]
MO71 User Command SSH

A User Command to launch an SSH session to the machine the queue manager is on

For “Remote” queue managers you might want to have quick access to a telnet/putty/ssh session to the machine the queue manager is running on. The session you use might vary based on the platform of the machine. For example, for your z/OS queue managers you might want to start a 3270 session. So there’s another possible network, you could also categorize your queue managers by platform. You can use the %c substitution character to pass the connection name (without port number) through to the command.

These User Commands can run anything you can imagine doing in a script. These might be quite simple wrapper scripts or quite complex scripts. You could use it to run an MQSCX script that generates a report with a known file name, and then open the script with something like notepad to view the results.

mqscx -x -f -C "=import file(C:\MQGem\MQReport.mqx) parms(%1)"
notepad C:\MQGem\Output\MQReport_%1_%2_%3_%4.txt

The User Command would then run the command file:

C:\MQGem\runReport.cmd %q %y %m %d

When generating files, it is common to use dates and times in the file names. The other inserts available as substitutions in User Commands are those you can use to generate dates and time, as follows.

Insert Meaning
%d Day of the month e.g. 16
%D Day of the month e.g. Mon, Tue, Wed
%H Current time hours
%m Current Month e.g. Jan, Feb, Mar
%M Current time minutes
%S Current time seconds
%t Current time in HH.MM.SS format
%y Four digit year

You can also start other programs directly from MO71, and pass in the queue manager name as a parameter where required. For GUI applications make sure the User Command is defined with Hidden set to No or the GUI won’t be visible. If you are an MQSCX user as well as an MO71 user, you may prefer to use MQSCX rather than the MQSC window in MO71 for command line operations. You can create a user command to start an MQSCX session up for the queue manager through a User Command.

The flexibility of running any command scripts means you can do a lot with this, but if you think of other inserts or requirements on this feature, please drop us a line, or leave a comment below to let us know.


The new version can be downloaded from the MO71 Download Page. Any current licensed users of MO71 can run the new version on their existing licence. If you don’t have a licence and would like to try out MO71 then send an email to support@mqgem.com and a 1-month trial licence will be sent to you.

IBM MQ and MQ Appliance News – March 2017

On Firday March 17th, IBM Hursley made available the next in the series of Continuous Delivery releases for IBM MQ V9.0 and the MQ Appliance. IBM MQ V9.0.2 is now available.

Unlike V9.0.1 there are no announcement letters.

Read about the changes in this blog post by Leif Davidsen.

Other links of interest:-

Or watch this video.


We’ll collect up any other links about the new release as we find them and put them all here.

Displaying host names in MO71

When looking at channel status as reported by IBM MQ, you see the connection name of the channel’s partner, which shows the IP address. IP addresses are not all that memorable, especially as we move into a world with more IPv6 addresses! If you use generic receiver (RCVR) or server-connection (SVRCONN) channels, as is good practice, this can be especially difficult as the channel name is the same for all connections.

MO71 Channel Status IP addresses

All MQ shows you in channel status connection names are the IP addresses

It is possible to improve your understanding about the connections by also displaying the Remote Queue Manager Name (RQMNAME) or Remote Application Name (RAPPLTAG), but with the latest version of MO71, you can now also improve it further by displaying the host name associated with the IP address.

MO71 Channel Status Hostnames

You can configure MO71 to show you hostnames too

In the background, MO71 will make a call to DNS to find out the host name associated with an IP address should it need to be displayed. You choose to display hostnames in a Channel Status List Dialog (such as those shown above), by going into the Alter List… option on the context menu and adding the “Host Name” column to your display. DNS calls can be slow to return so MO71 will cache the results it obtains. You can control how long this caching is for, and clear the cache completely from the Connection tab in the Preferences dialog. If you check the “Save resolved hostnames” option, MO71 will also save the cached values across a restart of the application.

MO71 DNS preferences

The preference options associated with the host name feature

If you find that host names are mainly from a particular domain, and it would be easier to read them without all those dot separated suffixes, you can also configure in the above preferences section, any DNS suffixes to be removed, for example, we could remove mqgem.com in the above examples.

MO71 Channel Status Hostnames Suffix Removed

You can configure MO71 to remove DNS suffixes from host names

If you find that host names are still not memorable enough, or if you are not able to resolve all your IP addresses to suitable hostnames, there is an additional feature. You can create a DNS User file containing your own values. These will be used in preference to any system values retrieved from the DNS. This file could look as follows:-

* MO71 DNS User Values file

192.168.2.106             Dept ASN.RQ server: Contact x2479
192.168.2.107             Dept SALES server: Contact x2588 (Bob)
fe80::9075:a1eb:379d:e7be Business Partner RGHT: Contact Mark 222-567-9765
fe80::9543:124e:4bf7:6374 Devt/Test server: Contact x2544

which would cause MO71 to display that data as the host name in preference to the DNS retrieved values.

MO71 Channel Status User Hostnames

Using the DNS User file you can display any string you want

UPDATE: A minor enhancement to MO71 V9.0.3 adds this host name display to the Queue Usage (DISPLAY QSTATUS) and Connection List (DISPLAY CONN) dialogs too.

So, never be puzzled about what machine an IP address is again. Set up MO71 to show you the string that is most memorable for you.


The new version can be downloaded from the MO71 Download Page. Any current licensed users of MO71 can run the new version on their existing licence. If you don’t have a licence and would like to try out MO71 then send an email to support@mqgem.com and a 1-month trial licence will be sent to you.

Creating a CCDT for any version

You may have read an earlier post where we described being able to determine what version of CCDT you had in your hand.

CCDT Version

How often have you had a CCDT file in your hand and wondered what version it was and whether you can give it to some of your known back-level client machines to use.

MQSCX can help you determine this. Open up your CCDT using the mqscx -n mode and then you can quite simply display the version number of all your client channels therein.

What you may not have realised from that post however, was that not only can MQSCX help to investigate what version number your CCDT is made for, it can also make a CCDT for the correct version as well. If you have back-level clients, it can be a real pain having to keep a queue manager of the same level around just to be able to create a CCDT that it will understand. Well, you can ditch that queue manager and use MQSCX instead. It’s really easy to do as well.

To use MQSCX to work with a CCDT, you need to use the -n parameter. This will then look for the CCDT file in the location specified by the MQCHLLIB and MQCHLTAB environment variables unless you provide the -t parameter to give it a specific file name. If one doesn’t exist, it will make a new one for you, and if one does exist it will read it and allow you to update it. In order to control the version of CCDT you are creating, you should additionally use the -V parameter which allows you to specify the version the CCDT file should be written as.

Here’s an example, run the MQSCX program like this:

mqscx -n -t C:\MQGem\CCDT\MQGEM.TAB -V7.0

And then you can use it to make DISPLAY, ALTER and DELETE commands.

MQSCX Extended MQSC Program – Version 8.0.0

CCDT commands directed to file ‘C:\MQGem\CCDT\MQGEM.TAB’

Licenced to Paul Clarke

Licence Location: Head Office

[12:02:10] DISPLAY CHANNEL(*) CONNAME VERSION

_________________________________________________

CHANNEL(MQG1.SVRCONN) CHLTYPE(CLNTCONN)

CONNAME(win12.mqgem.com(1602)) VERSION(8.0)

_________________________________________________

CHANNEL(MQG2.SVRCONN) CHLTYPE(CLNTCONN)

CONNAME(aix5.mqgem.com(4231)) VERSION(8.0)

_________________________________________________

CHANNEL(MQG3.SVRCONN) CHLTYPE(CLNTCONN)

CONNAME(mvs1.mqgem.com(1255)) VERSION(8.0)

_________________________________________________

Total display responses – Received:3

>

As you can see, at the moment all the channels in this CCDT are at V8.0 which means my V7.0 client won’t be able to read them. I need to make a change to each record to ensure MQSCX will write it out at version V7.0 as I have indicated on my start command. Helpfully, I can do that in one single command:-

ALTER CHANNEL(*)

This makes no actual change to the attributes of the channel definition, but does ‘touch’ each record to ensure that it gets the new version. Displaying the records again as above will show that the version number for each channel mentioned by the ALTER command (in this example all of them), now indicates it is at version V7.0, just what my back-level client application needs.

Exiting MQSCX and re-running it will show you that this earlier version of the CCDT has indeed been hardened.

Note that if you had been using some attributes introduced in later versions than V7.0, this information would be lost when altering the channel definition to be an earlier version.


If you’d like to try out MQSCX, please email support@mqgem.com to request a trial licence.

Running MQGem GUIs under WINE

MQGem with WINEWe spent the festive season partaking of a little wine which resulted in our recent announcement of the capability to run both the MQGem Software GUI applications, MO71 and MQEdit, on Intel Linux. This is achieved by running them under WINE. WINE is a fabulous piece of free software that comes from the WINE project. This software allows a huge range of Windows applications to run, virtually unchanged, on an Intel Linux machine. The software is not an emulator but rather translates Windows API calls to POSIX calls on the fly which means that it is fast and efficient. For most users, wine may even be already installed on your Linux system, for others, it will be as simple as issuing the command:-

yum install wine.i686

N.B. The MQGem GUIs are 32-bit Windows applications which is why you must install the wine.i686 package rather than letting the system decide which wine package you need based on the bitness of your O/S.

However, everybody’s Linux is just that little bit different. If you find when using the above command that it responds with:-

No package wine available.

then this means that the yum source repositories you currently use do not contain the WINE packages. The WINE packages are in the EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) repository which can be added to your yum as described in How can I install the packages from the EPEL software repository?

If the EPEL repository still refuses to play ball, there are a plethora of StackOverflow questions (with answers) to solve Cannot retrieve metalink for repository: epel.
Once you get WINE installed, there is one other piece of the puzzle. If you tried to run the mqmonntp.exe under WINE as-is, the GUI would run, but when you try to connect to MQ using it the following error would be shown.

Error connecting to 'MQG1' RC(2012) Environment error.

So before you do, you should download a new package from MQGem Software, an MQ WINE mapping layer. This is a shared object that maps from the MQI calls made that the Windows application expects to find in mqm.dll or mqic32.dll, and instead calls the locally installed entry points in the libmqm_r.so and libmqic_r.so libraries. These mapping packages are called mqm.dll.so and mqic32.dll.so.

So download the zipped tar file mq_wine.tgz, and untar the file using a command such as

tar -xvzf mq_wine.tgz

You need to put these libraries where WINE will find them. Your two choices are:

  • Put them in /usr/lib/wine
  • Put them where ever you like but ensure that the path is added to WINEDLLPATH environment variable.

Now download the latest version of MO71 or MQEdit and unzip it on your Linux system. We have made one or two minor changes to the programs to fix things we have discovered in our testing of them under WINE, so it is best if you start off with all the fixes to things we’ve found. If you already run MO71 with a Diamond or Enterprise licence then you can also copy your licence file across onto your Linux machine (assuming you’re on the same site for your Diamond licence). If you use an Emerald licence, then you’ll need one for this machine. If you’d like to try it out on Linux before you make your mind up to buy another Emerald, then please email support@mqgem.com to request a trial licence.

To run the program, use this command:-

wine mqmonntp [ MO71 parameters ]

Once you are comfortable that MO71 starts and runs correctly you may want to set up an icon on your desktop to issue this command and possibly run it in the background.

Cheers!

Looking back on 2016

In this post we look back on the year that was 2016 and what happened in both IBM MQ, and MQGem Software.

New Versions

Both IBM MQ and MQGem Software products had a number of new releases in 2016.

MQGem Software products

Three new versions of our premier product, MO71 – a graphical administrative product for IBM MQ. Major version 9.0.0 was released in June to support the IBM MQ V9.0.0 release as well as adding several new features. Then two micro releases, version 9.0.1 was released in August, and version 9.0.2 was released in October.

An update to version 8.0.1 of MQSCX – our extended MQSC product, was released in January, and a series of blog posts described the new features. Then later in the year, major version 9.0.0 was released in July to support the IBM MQ V9.0.0 release as well as adding several major new features, for example, functions.

A new version of QLOAD – our unload/load IBM MQ queues product, QLOAD V8.0.2 was released in January.

Our newest product MQEdit – a live-parsing IBM MQ message editor – was announced in Beta in August, and is free to run until at least January 2017. A new driver was released in November providing a new major feature, user formats.

IBM MQ Fix Packs and new function

The last Fix Pack on IBM WebSphere MQ V7.0.1, Fix Pack 7.0.1.14 was released in August. Two new Fix Packs on IBM WebSphere MQ V7.1. Fix Pack 7.1.0.7 in November, and 7.1.0.6 in January. Two new Fix Packs on IBM WebSphere MQ V7.5. Fix Pack 7.5.0.6 was released in March. Fix Pack 7.5.0.7 was released in September. One new Fix Pack on IBM MQ V8. Fix Pack 8.0.0.5 was released in February.

2016 saw the latest major release of IBM MQ, V9.0.0, announced in April and available in June. At the same time, hardware updates were made to the MQ Appliance. As we were later to discover, V9.0.0 was the starting point for a new delivery model for IBM MQ. In November, V9.0.1, the first continuous delivery (CD) release was made available. You can now choose whether to move forward with new function in regular drops, or stay on the Long Term Service (LTS) release and get new function after a longer period has elapsed. At the same time, the MQ Appliance became a V9 queue manager.

Changes were also made to the MQLight function. Now it is available in IBM Message Hub, with advice to migrate from the MQLight Service to Message Hub if you’re a Bluemix user.

Conference Events

There have been quite a number of events throughout 2016 that have had IBM MQ content delivered at them. A separate post contains all the material that is available on-line from these various events.

Online articles

There have been some really great blog posts written throughout 2016. Lots of the guys in IBM Hursley have been blogging about the new features they have been releasing throughout the year. The IBM MQ Blogosphere has really grown over 2016. Read more in IBM MQ Blogosphere in 2016.

2016 has been a great year for all things MQ. MQGem wishes all its customers, readers, and friends a Happy and Prosperous 2017. HAPPY NEW YEAR!

IBM MQ Blogosphere in 2016

The IBM MQ Blogosphere is the set of blogs that cover content about the IBM MQ product. I wrote about the MQ Blogosphere at the end of 2015. This post is an update showing the new bloggers we’ve gained in 2016, and the existing bloggers that have continued to post great articles for you to read. I hope you’re following all these great blogs to get a feed of interesting an informative MQ blog posts.

No PhotoAlamelu Nagarajan started blogging in 2016. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Andy OwenAndy Owen dipped a toe into the MQ Blogosphere this year – see his first post on the MQDev blog. developerWorks Logo
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Ant BeardsmoreAnthony Beardsmore has been blogging for several years, often about Queue Manager Clustering, but now he has turned his attention to blogging about the MQ Appliance. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Anil SahuAnil Sahu has rekindled his blogged career in 2016 after writing a little back in 2014. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Arthur BarrArthur Barr started blogging about MQ in 2015 and it’s great to see more posts from him in 2016. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Chris MatthewsonChris Matthewson snuck in his first blog post on MQDev right at the end of the year. Is this a sign of things to come? developerWorks Logo
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Chuck MisuracaChuck Misuraca works for an MQ ISV, Perficient, and he occasionally blogs over on the Perficient blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
Colin PaiceColin Paice has his own blog, Colin Paice Blog, where he writes stories about the things he discovers about MQ on z/OS. Colin has been stressing the performance and usability of MQ on z/OS for as long as I can remember, and gets changes made to the product for the benefit of its customers as a result of the things he discovers. He also makes regular appearances on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Gwydion TudurA brand new blogger in late 2015, Gwydion Tudur has continued his blogging on MQDev throughout 2016 – see his posts. I am very happy to see him continue to post. LinkedIn Logo
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No PhotoJames Robertson snuck in his first blog post on MQDev right at the end of the year. Is this a sign of things to come? developerWorks Logo
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Jamie SquibbA brand new blogger in 2016, Jamie Squibb blogs on MQDev – see his posts. Jamie has worked in the IBM MQ for z/OS area for many years, and I am glad to see he’s now also turning his hand to blogging. I hope to see many more posts from Jamie in 2017! LinkedIn Logo
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John ColgraveA new member of the IBM MQ Blogosphere in late 2015, John Colgrave has continued blogging throughout 2016 – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Jon RumseyThose of you lucky enough to have met Jon Rumsey will soon realise the breadth and depth of his knowledge of the IBM MQ product is incredible. Most recently he’s majored in security, being extremely knowledgeable about Advanced Message Security and also channel security. He’s also a big fan of the IBM i platform. He’s been blogging for a couple of years now. You can read his posts over on the MQDev blog. LinkedIn Logo
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Leif DavidsenLeif Davidsen has his own blog, Leifdavidsen’s Blog, where he writes about Messaging, Connectivity and more. It’s a wordpress blog just like this one, and so is very easy to follow, and well worth it! He also comes up with some of the best titles for blog posts! LinkedIn Logo
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Lyn ElkinsLyn Elkins has her own blog, Lyns Random Thoughts, where she writes about MQ on her favourite platform, z/OS. After going offline last year, Lyn’s now got her domain back up and running with a new blog. LinkedIn Logo
Mark BluemelMark Bluemel is an occasional blogger, writing on subjects he is very knowledgeable about, namely the Java and JMS support in IBM MQ – see his posts on the MQDev blog. developerWorks Logo
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Mark CampbellMark Campbell snuck in his first blog post on MQDev right at the end of the year. Is this a sign of things to come? developerWorks Logo
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Mark TaylorMark Taylor started blogging on MQDev in late 2015, and has written a fair few posts this year too. See his posts. You’ll also find lots of MQ videos featuring Mark. LinkedIn Logo
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No PhotoMark Whitlock dipped a toe into the MQ Blogosphere this year – see his first post on the MQDev blog. developerWorks Logo
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Mark WilsonMark Wilson has been blogging since 2014, and has written on the AIM Support Blog, the IBM Messaging blog and the MQDev blog. Mark started his MQ career on the z/OS platform, but has been expanding his knowledge to cover the distributed platforms too. LinkedIn Logo
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Mark WomackMark Womack has been blogging over on the AIM Support Blog for a number of years, always with a perspective to help MQ customers, his ‘tracking technical trends’ posts are always interesting – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Matt LemingMatt Leming has been blogging about MQ since 2014. He writes about the MQ on z/OS product over on the MQDev blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Matt WhiteheadMatt Whitehead has been blogging for a year or two now. He writes about MQLight and Bluemix, over on the MQDev blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Mayur RajaMayur Raja has worked on IBM MQ for z/OS for many years and is a very experienced z/OS developer. He has started blogging about MQ this year. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Miguel RodriguezMiguel Rodriguez works in IBM in the L2 Service team for IBM MQ, and he blogs over on the AIM Support Blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
Morag HughsonMorag started her blogging career in IBM. After leaving IBM she joined MQGem Software, an MQ ISV that produces tools to assist with your MQ system, and she now blogs on the MQGem Software blog, and also over on the IBM MiddleWare User Community. You’ll also see her regularly answering questions on StackOverflow. LinkedIn Logo
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Nathan WilsonNathan Wilson works for an MQ ISV, W3Partnership, and he occasionally blogs over on the W3Partnership blog – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Paul TitheridgePaul Titheridge started blogging at the start of 2016, although he’s been a successful IBM MQ writer through many IBM Technotes in the past. He writes up problems seen in his day job in Level 3 service that are useful for all users to see. It’s a great way to get the word out about common problems. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. Paul can also be found on the IBM MQ Service YouTube channel. LinkedIn Logo
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Pete SiddallAnyone who’s met Pete Siddall, the STSM for MQ on z/OS, knows how passionate he is about the platform and the MQ product that runs on it. Pete helps MQ on z/OS customers in a million different ways, and still has found time to write the occasional blog post over on MQDev – see his posts. LinkedIn Logo
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Richard PilotHaving started his blogging career in 2015, Richard Pilot continued with a few posts this year too – see his posts. Looking forward to more in 2017! LinkedIn Logo
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Rob ParkerRob Parker has been blogging for a year or two now. You can read his posts over on the MQDev blog. LinkedIn Logo
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Roger LacroixRoger Lacroix has his own blog, Roger’s Blog on MQ, Java, C, etc…, where he writes about MQ as well as a variety of other subjects. Roger works for Capitalware, an MQ ISV that produces exits and tools for your MQ system, and runs the annual MQTC Conference. LinkedIn Logo
Sajina Puthalath KandySajina Puhtalath Kandy started blogging in 2016. She blogs on the MQDev blog – see her posts. LinkedIn Logo
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No PhotoSam Goulden started blogging about the MQ Appliance this year. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Sam MasseySam Massey works in the performance team for Distributed MQ, and has entered the MQ Blogosphere this year with a few performance related posts – see his posts on the MQDev blog. LinkedIn Logo
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ShashiShashikanth Thambrahalli has been blogging for as long as I can remember. I think he might have been one of the founding members of the MQDev blog! Shashi is passionate about the service of our product, and the go to man for .NET and XMS too. This years he’s also been blogging about MFT. See his posts on the MQDev blog. You’ll also see him regularly answering questions on StackOverflow. LinkedIn Logo
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No PhotoSimon Davitt started his blogging career in 2016 with a couple of posts on MQDev. Hope to see more in 2017. developerWorks Logo
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No PhotoSridhar Ravindra started blogging in 2016. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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Thomas LeendTom started blogging at the start of 2016, writing up problems seen in his day job in Level 3 service, that are useful for all users to see. It’s a great way to get the word out about common problems. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. Tom can also be found on the IBM MQ Service YouTube channel. LinkedIn Logo
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T.RobT.Rob Wyatt has his own blog, Store and Forward – A blog about securing and using WebSphere MQ, where he writes about MQ, and then he also writes over on the IBM MiddleWare User Community. T.Rob has looked at MQ from every angle, he’s been a customer, an IBMer and now, a consultant offering his incredible knowledge about MQ, to get your MQ system running smoothly. You’ll also see him regularly answering questions on StackOverflow. LinkedIn Logo
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Tony SharkeyTony Sharkey is an IBM MQ for z/OS Performance expert. If you’ve got any interest in MQ on z/OS, you’ve probably read at lot of Tony’s writing over the years as he’s contributed hugely to the Performance Reports you get for every release. Now he’s blogging as well. He blogs on the MQDev blog – see his posts. developerWorks Logo
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It is so great to see so many IBM MQ experts taking the time to write blog posts for you all to read. If you don’t follow one or more of these blogs, you should. Clicking on the “Follow” button is easy! I look forward to reading many more blog posts in 2017, and sharing them in our Monthly Newsletter. Thanks to all our MQ bloggers!


Footnote: If you’ve blogged about IBM MQ in 2016 and you’re not in the above list, let me know in the comments and I’ll add you to the list, and your blog to our IBM MQ Resources Page if it’s not already there.