Configuring List Dialogs in MO71

MO71 is our graphical administration tool for IBM MQ. You can manage all the different object types in MQ using its lists and object dialogs. The lists are fully flexible allowing you to determine which fields are interesting to you and which are not and choosing only to display those columns in the list as a result.

You can make these changes temporarily, just to the instance of the dialog you are currently using. You can make them more permanently, so that every time you bring up that list on that queue manager, you have the same columns. Or finally, you can make these changes across all your queue managers, because the columns you want are the ones you think should be the default set. You can also change the columns in a dynamic manner using filters.

This post will cover these various different mechanisms.

Temporarily alter the list shown

When looking at a list of objects you can change the columns that are displayed by selecting the Options -> Alter List… item from the context menu.

MO71 Alter List Menu

This will bring up a dialog where you can locate the additional columns you want to display. So I’ve got a list of queues, with some cluster queues and I want to see the Cluster Queue Manager that hosts the cluster queues, so I locate the field Cluster Queue Manager Name (CLUSQMGR) in the right hand side of the window in the list of “Remaining Fields”, and move it to the “List Contents” by pressing the  <<  button. Then I can move its position in the columns on the left hand side using the up and down buttons, and press   OK   to complete the change.

MO71 Change Queue List attributes

Now you’ll see that your queue list has the additional column you selected. However, if you close the queue list dialog, and later open another queue list dialog, you’ll see that your alteration to the list of fields shown has been forgotten, it was a temporary change that you made.

Permanently alter the list for one queue manager

Following exactly the same process as above, with one small change, you can make the change permanent for that queue manager. On the dialog which allows you to change the columns shown, instead of just pressing   OK   to make the change, first press Apply All which applies the change to all instances of that particular list dialog for this queue manager, both those currently open, and any future invocations of that list dialog. This change is also remembered across a restart of the MO71 program.

MO71 Change Queue List attributes Apply All

Permanently alter the list for all queue managers

In essence, this mechanism is changing the defaults for list dialogs. If you add a new queue manager to MO71, it will pick up the default columns too.

Using the menu option View -> Set Default Lists -> Queue List… (or whichever list dialog you want to change), you will be presented with a very similar dialog to the one above, except instead of referring to a single queue manager in the window title, it will indicate that it is a “global” list.

MO71 Change global Queue List attributes

Pressing   OK   or  Apply  on the global change list dialog will set the new default and all queue managers that have not had their list changed by the above mechanisms will pick up these new defaults. Pressing Apply All on this dialog will set all queue managers to use this list instead of anything that may have previously been altered by the above mechanisms. Because this is a ‘destructive’ setting (i.e. you lose previous set up you might have done), there is a confirmation dialog for this change. This change is also remembered across a restart of the MO71 program.

MO71 Change global Queue List attributes Confirmation

Changing columns in a filter

You can also change the column display from within a filter. This can particularly useful when creating pre-defined dialogs. Especially if you want to have several different ‘default’ sets of columns.

This can be done in two ways. Firstly by adding a ‘#’ character after a keyword or user variable name, to show it as a column on the end of the display. The example below has a filter which creates a user variable called “Fullness” and as a result of the ‘#’ character on the end, also displays that as a column.

MO71 Fullness column

The other way to manipulate columns from within a filter is to use the showcol and hidecol functions. This is very useful in a pre-defined dialog, allowing you to change the default set of columns to exactly what you need for this dialog. You might, for example, have several different queue lists, one for cluster queues, one for transmission queues, and one for dead-letter queues across all your queue managers. You can imagine wanting slightly different columns on display for each one.

The showcol function takes the MQSC spelling of the keyword and the column position, and the hidecol function just takes the keyword.

MO71 showcol hidecol

Heopfully now you can have exactly the columns you want on display in any list you are viewing. If you have any questions please leave a comment below, or get in touch.


If you don’t have a licence and would like to try out MO71 then send an email to support@mqgem.com and a 1-month trial licence will be sent to you.

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Looking forward to MQTCv2.0.1.7

MQTC IconIt’s nearly September, and in less than four weeks is the MQTC conference in Sandusky, Ohio.

MQTC – the only conference dedicated to IBM MQ – takes place from September 25 to September 27. There is a full schedule of technical sessions as well as a number of vendor sessions. There’s also lots of information about the conference on the CapitalWare Blog, and you can follow the twitter hashtag #MQTC2017.

MQGem Software is a Gold Sponsor of the conference, so come and find us in the evening Sponsor Pavilion, held in the Zambezi room, on Monday and Tuesday, and we can demonstrate any of the MQGem products to you and you can enter our prize draw. Or just grab a beer from the bar and come and say “Hello”.

Paul Clarke and Morag Hughson will be there from MQGem Software, doing a number of technical sessions:-

Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
Introduction to the MQI
Morag Hughson
Monday 1:00pm Leopardwood; Tuesday 2:30pm Aloeswood
Abstract: This entry level session will teach the basics of the beautifully simple MQ API – the MQI. You’ll have heard many describe how writing an application for MQ is very simple, just MQPUT a message, or MQGET a message. Come to this session and learn it for yourself. Example code in C and COBOL will be used, and a live demonstration using an API Exerciser will show how some of the input and output fields operate.
Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
Learn to code the MQ Message Property MQI calls
Morag Hughson
Monday 3:50pm Rosewood; Wednesday 9:50am Leopardwood
Abstract: This session will introduce you to the MQI message property calls. You’ll learn how to create message handles, and use them to populate, or read message properties on an IBM MQ message. Example code in C and COBOL will be used, and a live demonstration using an API Exerciser will show how some of the input and output fields operate.
Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
Using Application Activity Trace
Morag Hughson
Tuesday 9:50am Aloeswood; Wednesday 3:50pm Aloeswood
Abstract: Application Activity Trace is a feature of IBM MQ that allows you to discover exactly what the applications connected to your queue manager are doing. You can see the object names that they open and the options they use on the various verbs they call. You can find out about the size, persistence, priority and more, of your messages. Please note, this feature is only available on the Distributed platforms.
Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
Introduction to MQ Clients
Paul Clarke
Tuesday 8:30am Aloeswood; Wednesday 1:00pm Leopardwood
Abstract: This session introduces the IBM MQ clients: what they are, on which platforms they run, and how customers use them in their applications. We will mainly focus on the ‘C’ IBM MQ MQI client, but will also introduce the Java and XMS clients. The session will also discuss a number of basic implementation considerations, including when it may be appropriate to use each client and describe new client features. The intent is to familiarize you with the things necessary to succeed with a simple IBM MQ client implementation.

Paul will also be giving two vendor sessions:-

Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
The MQGems – MQ Administration tools from MQGem Software
Paul Clarke
Monday 11:15am Rosewood
Abstract: In this session, Paul Clarke, founder and CEO of MQGem Software, will take you through the administration tools that MQGem produces. This includes MO71 – our GUI administrator for MQ and MQSCX – a huge improvement on MQSC. The presentation will be largely based on demonstrations of the tools.
Title:
Speaker:
Scheduled:
The MQGems – Message manipulation tools from MQGem Software
Paul Clarke
Wednesday 11:15am Leopardwood
Abstract: In this session, Paul Clarke, founder and CEO of MQGem Software, will take you through the message manipulation tools that MQGem produces. This include MQEdit – our GUI Message editor for MQ, and QLOAD – the load/unload messages tool. The presentation will be largely based on demonstrations of the tools.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Application Activity Trace Viewer

IBM MQ has a feature called Application Activity Trace, which allows you to trace what an application is doing, see the progression of MQ API calls, the objects utilised, the options used, the time taken for each call and so on.

To get the most out of this feature, which writes its output as PCF messages, you need to be able to, not only read the content of those PCF messages, but display them in a way that allows you to drill down into the data, exclude data from your view to allow you to focus on what’s important, search for particular objects in use, or particular reason codes, and so on.

To this end, MO71 now has an Application Activity Trace viewer. At it’s simplest, it allows you to see the progression of MQ API calls, just like the IBM-supplied sample amqsact. However it can do so much more than that.

Activity Trace Output

MO71 Activity Trace Output

Drilling down

Rather than having to decide to view every MQ API call in high detail, the viewer allows you to drill down into the verb you are interested in, without the confusion of seeing high detail of everything else at the same time.

Activity Trace Drill down MQINQ

MO71 Activity Trace – Drill down into MQINQ

Activity Trace API Selection

MO71 Activity Trace API Selection

Filter the output

With a trace that spans many pages full, even when only showing one line per verb, you may wish to reduce the clutter on your screen further. You can filter the output in many different ways to see what you’re looking for. For example, you could choose to hide all the MQPUTs and MQGETs and focus on the other calls, like the MQOPENs.

Activity Trace No PUTs and GETs

MO71 Activity Trace with PUTs and GETs excluded

You can filter the output to focus on a particular object or objects that you are interested in, or a particular process id. In fact there are many different factors that you can used to filter down the data to make is easier to view.

Activity Trace Settings

MO71 Activity Trace Settings Tab with filtering

Health-checking your application

There are a number of behaviours that MO71 can check for in your application. These are listed on the Health tab, and if any issues are found you will see them highlighted with a red exclamation mark. You can display the instances in a separate window which then allows you to jump into the main output window at the point where the issue was detected.

Activity Trace Health

MO71 Activity Trace Health Tab

The current list of health issues is not final, and if you have any other issues you would like to see MO71 check for, please comment below or get in touch in the usual ways.

The Application Activity Trace viewer in MO71 will help you make sense of, and get great insight from, your tracing of your applications.


The new version can be downloaded from the MO71 Download Page. Any current licensed users of MO71 can run the new version on their existing licence. If you don’t have a licence and would like to try out MO71 then send an email to support@mqgem.com and a 1-month trial licence will be sent to you.

Migrating a Queue Manager?

If you’re planning to migrate a queue manager, from one machine to another, or perhaps you’re consolidating some queue managers onto an MQ Appliance, you are probably aware of, and have even become familiar with, the steps required to export your object definitions and recreate them on the new queue manager. There are a number of tools available that can do this for you – including those from MQGem.

What about your messages though?

While it’s generally a good idea to reduce the load, and drain off as many messages as you can prior to migrating a queue manager. For example if it’s in a cluster, suspend it from the cluster before the move, to reduce the number of messages heading its way. Let all the applications drain the queues of messages and so on. However, it’s not always possible to drain every last message from all your queues.

QLOAD Offload all queuesIn the latest version of QLOAD, V9.0.1, there’s a new feature that will help out when migrating a queue manager. It allows you to unload the messages from all your queues, with one command. And then you can load the messages onto the queues on another queue manager, with one command (or piecemeal if you prefer). You would combine this with your favoured object definition export tool, and before loading the messages, you’d first recreate the queues on the new queue manager with the exported commands.

Here’s an example of QLOAD unloading all the queues on my queue manager.

qload -m MQG1 -i* -f*

The command will produce the following output to show what has been unloaded. Using the -i (lower case) flag means that the messages are only browsed on the queues and are not destructively removed.

APP1.INPUT                                           2  Done.
APP1.RESULT                                         10  Done.
APP2.INPUT                                           1  Done.
APP2.RESULT                                          4  Done.
Q1                                                  28  Done.
Q2                                                  42  Done.
SYSTEM.ADMIN.QMGR.EVENT                              7  Done.
SYSTEM.AUTH.DATA.QUEUE                             126  Done.
SYSTEM.CHANNEL.SYNCQ                                 3  Done.
SYSTEM.CHLAUTH.DATA.QUEUE                            5  Done.
SYSTEM.CLUSTER.REPOSITORY.QUEUE                      3  Done.
SYSTEM.DURABLE.SUBSCRIBER.QUEUE                      1  Done.
SYSTEM.HIERARCHY.STATE                               2  Done.
SYSTEM.INTER.QMGR.FANREQ                             1  Done.
SYSTEM.RETAINED.PUB.QUEUE                            2  Done.
WORK.REQUEST                                         7  Done.

Total : 7 Queues, 94 Messages
 plus : 9 System Queues, 150 Messages

Listing the directory where I ran the qload command, I can now see I have a file for each queue, with an extension .qld. If you prefer to have a different extension then you can alter the command accordingly. For example, use -f*.txt.

I can copy these files to another machine, or simply use a client connection to the other machine accordingly. Then I can run the following QLOAD command to load the messages onto the new queue manager.

qload -m MQG1 -o* -f*

QLOAD will make some checks when you run a load for multiple queues in this way. It will check that all the queues exist that it has files for in the directory matching the file pattern you specified (which assumes an extension of .qld if you just use ‘*’), and it will check that all those queues are empty. If it finds any problems it will report as follows:-

APP1.RESULT                            RC(2085) Unknown object name.
APP2.RESULT                            Not empty.

There are potential problems with these queues.
Are you sure you want to continue?

This lets you know to go and define the missing queues if you need them – there are messages to go onto them so the assumption is that you do need them. It also warns you of non-empty queues. Now if you’ve already started using this queue manager, you might be expecting this situation, but otherwise, you should rectify it, and then re-run QLOAD.

APP1.INPUT                                       2     Done.
APP1.RESULT                                      10    Done.
APP2.INPUT                                       1     Done.
APP2.RESULT                                      4     Done.
Q1                                               28    Done.
Q2                                               42    Done.
WORK.REQUEST                                     7     Done.

Total : 7 Queues, 94 Messages

You’ll notice that this output does not mention the SYSTEM queues that were offloaded. A generic upload will not upload most SYSTEM queues.
SYSTEM.CLUSTER.TRANSMIT.QUEUE and SYSTEM.DEAD.LETTER.QUEUE are the exceptions. The messages were unloaded to files though, so if you really need to load them you can do so the traditional way, by specifying the full queue name on the command and not using the generic upload.


The new version can be downloaded from the QLOAD Download Page. Any current licensed users of QLOAD can run the new version on their existing licence. If you don’t have a licence and would like to try out QLOAD then send an email to support@mqgem.com and a 1-month trial licence will be sent to you.

Running the Trigger Monitor as a SERVICE

There was a recent update to MO71 that allowed multiple SERVICE objects to be edited at once.

The example used in the screenshot was of the trigger monitor being run as a service, and is straight out of Knowledge Center (with the exception of a more meaningful object name).

It uses the provided amqsstop program as recommended too. The parameters that amqsstop expects are provided in the STOPARG which include the +MQ_SERVER_PID+ which is a token representing the process id of the process started by the STARTCMD and STARTARG arguments.

I was playing around with this SERVICE object a little more today and discovered that the STOP SERVICE command doesn’t work. This post covers what I discovered and how to fix it.

You’ll note from the screen shot that I’m running a 64-bit Windows queue manager – you can tell that from the path of the amqsstop program which is in the bin64 directory. However, I used the runmqtrm program from the bin directory. This is no doubt a migratory aid for those users that had scripts etc starting the trigger monitor from that location prior to the Windows queue manager becoming a 64-bit entity.

Having started my trigger monitor with the above definition, I can see it’s status using the DISPLAY SVSTATUS command.

AMQ8632: Display service status details.
   SERVICE(TRIGGER.MONITOR)                STATUS(RUNNING)
   PID(3384)                               SERVTYPE(SERVER)
   STARTDA(2017-06-17)                     STARTTI(11.40.55)
   CONTROL(QMGR)                           STARTCMD(C:\mqm8004\bin/runmqtrm)
   STARTARG(-m MQG1 -q ACCOUNTS.INITQ)     STOPCMD(C:\mqm8004\bin64/amqsstop)
   STOPARG(-m MQG1 -p 3384)             
   DESCR(Trigger Monitor Service Auto Started with QMgr)
   STDOUT( )                               STDERR( )

Part of this display is the process ID of the trigger monitor, and you can also see that the replaceable insert +MQ_PROCESS_ID+ in the STOPARG attribute has been replaced with the same PID.

When you issue the MQ command STOP SERVICE(TRIGGER.MONITOR) it issues a PCF Inquire Connections command with a WHERE clause asking for all those connections where the PID is 3384. You can see in the MQ trace that the answer which comes back is MQRCCF_NONE_FOUND.

Now I know the trigger monitor is running so I find it myself in a DISPLAY CONN command and I see this:-

AMQ8276: Display Connection details.
   CONN(876C445920002201)                
   EXTCONN(414D51434D5147312020202020202020)
   TYPE(*)                               
   PID(4604)                               TID(1) 
   APPLDESC(WebSphere MQ Trigger Monitor)
   APPLTAG(:\mqm8004\bin64\runmqtrm.exe)   APPLTYPE(SYSTEM)
   ASTATE(NONE)                            CHANNEL( )
   CLIENTID( )                             CONNAME( )
   CONNOPTS(MQCNO_SHARED_BINDING)          USERID(MUSR_MQADMIN)
   UOWLOG( )                               UOWSTDA(2017-06-17)
   UOWSTTI(11.40.55)                       UOWLOGDA( )
   UOWLOGTI( )                             URTYPE(QMGR)
   EXTURID(XA_FORMATID[] XA_GTRID[] XA_BQUAL[])
   QMURID(0.20482)                         UOWSTATE(ACTIVE)

So there are two interesting things in this output. Firstly the PID is different. Secondly, it’s the bin64 version of runmqtrm. There’s no sign of the bin version of runmqtrm with PID(3384) anywhere in DISPLAY CONN. So I guess it didn’t make a connection to the queue manager.

Next thing to check out is the processes that the Windows OS thinks are running. I look for and find both PID(3384) and PID(4604).

runmqtrm processes

Two processes running called runmqtrm

So it seems that the runmqtrm in the bin directory is not a copy of the one in the bin64 directory, but something else that starts the bin64 version of runmqtrm. This means that amqsstop doesn’t work because it is trying to find the first process which never connected to the queue manager.

The fix to get your Trigger Monitor Service definition to work again with a STOP SERVICE command is to use the bin64 version of runmqtrm directly in the STARTCMD and avoid this double hop which leaves you with two processes running unnecessarily.

DEFINE SERVICE(TRIGGER.MONITOR) +
       SERVTYPE(SERVER) CONTROL(QMGR) +
       DESCR('Trigger Monitor Service Auto Started with QMgr') +
       STARTCMD('+MQ_INSTALL_PATH+bin64\runmqtrm') +
       STARTARG('-m +QMNAME+ -q ACCOUNTS.INITQ') +
       STOPCMD('+MQ_INSTALL_PATH+bin64\amqsstop') +
       STOPARG('-m +QMNAME+ -p +MQ_SERVER_PID+')

You don’t have the same problem on Unixes, because there aren’t the two bin directories on those platforms. So this is very specific to Windows.

Really it’s a shame that there isn’t a replaceable insert something like +MQ_BIN_DIR_PATH+ so that these platform differences would be completely removed from the SERVICE object definition. But I suppose you could make one yourself and put it into the service.env file.


IBM Certified SpecialistIBM Champion 2017 Cloud

Morag Hughson
IBM Champion 2017 – Cloud
IBM Certified System Administrator – MQ V8.0
Find her on: LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/moraghughson Twitter: https://twitter.com/MoragHughson SlideShare: http://www.slideshare.net/moraghughson developerWorks: https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/profiles/html/profileView.do?userid=110000EQPN

IBM MQ and MQ Appliance News – May 2017

On Tuesday May 30th, IBM Hursley made available the next in the series of Continuous Delivery releases for IBM MQ V9.0 and the MQ Appliance. IBM MQ V9.0.3 is now available.

Downloading IBM MQ Version 9.0.3 Continuous Delivery

This was announced on z/OS VUE:-

Links of interest:-


We’ll collect up any other links about the new release as we find them and put them all here.

IBM MQ V9 LTS FixPack 1

IBM recently shipped the first Fix Pack for the V9.0.0 Long Term Support (LTS) release.

Downloading IBM MQ Version 9.0.0.1

Spotted by one of our eagle-eyed followers, this document indicates:-

IBM MQ Version 9.0.0, Fix Pack 1 is released only on AIX, IBMi, Linux, and Windows. It is not released on HP-UX or Solaris.

EDIT: Fix Pack 1 is now available on HP-UX on Itanium, Solaris on SPARC, and Solaris on x86 64 as of 15 June 2017. Download from the above link.

We asked IBM why this was the case, and here is the answer.

9.0.0.1 was not shipped on HP-UX and Solaris due to an ongoing quality issue in the JVM on those platforms. We expect 9.0.0 LTS maintenance to be available on these platforms in the future. For more info [on the JVM quality issue on those platforms], head here: Oracle Bug Report: JDK-8175251 : Failed to load RSA private key from pkcs12.